New application will caution trained civilians when there’s a medical crisis close-by

New application will caution trained civilians when there’s a medical crisis close-by

It’s an application that could enable you to spare a life.

It’s called “Pulse Point” and it propelled Thursday in Boone County.

Here’s the means by which it works: When a 911 call comes in for a heart assault, both first responders and anybody with the application who is inside a quarter mile will get cautions. That way, the unfortunate casualty can get help as fast as could reasonably be expected, expanding their odds of survival.

“One in three people get bystander CPR, so this is kind of a new approach,” said Stephanie Gardner, EMS medical director at St. Vincent. “Instead of trying to get the layperson to do CPR, who’s maybe scared of doing CPR, who’s not willing to do CPR, we’re taking people who are trained, who are willing, and bringing them to the scene quickly to get that started.”

The application was structured by a fire chief. He was eating on a restaurant patio when his group pulled up. Turns out somebody inside was having a heart attack, and the chief had no clue. He made the application to ensure those eager to help know when a cardiovascular crisis is going on.

The application is now accessible in Monroe, Clark, Dearborn and Hancock counties.

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