Looking at the Skies: Mars comes in opposition

Looking at the Skies: Mars comes in opposition

Mars has been extra brilliant this month, and the peak of brightness will show up this week as it comes into opposition.

The opposition of a planet happens when the Earth moves between the planet and the sun. Around the hour of opposition, a planet is most brightest from our vantage point on Earth.

Mars will be inverse the sun in the sky, which means it will be in the east at sunset and the west at sunrise. Around 12 PM, search for the red planet high in the south.

The official season of resistance is around 7 p.m. Tuesday. Mars will be more splendid this year at resistance than it will be again until 2035.

Mars is at present the fourth most splendid heavenly item in the night sky, overwhelming Jupiter in brilliance. Just the sun, the moon, and Venus shine brighter.

Venus is as yet clutching the title of the third most brilliant heavenly article. To spot Venus, look toward the east before sunrise. The moon will be near Venus in the east right off the bat Tuesday and Wednesday.

Despite the fact that Jupiter isn’t as splendid as Mars, it’s as yet a delightful sight during this season. Look toward the south-southwest at sunset to see Jupiter. Saturn is to one side of Jupiter.

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